Anticoagulation Management Outpatient Clinic Opens to Better Serve Patients on Blood Thinning Medications

November 3, 2009

For most of us, the process of blood clotting happens without much thought. We cut ourselves, and the bleeding stops by forming a clot that later is reabsorbed back into the body when the cut is healed. However, for patients with reduced blood flow, blood vessel injury or a change in the blood, clotting can lead to serious medical complications, even death.

Anticoagulation is a drug therapy that slows blood clotting to prevent the development of harmful clots. Sometimes the medications are referred to as “blood thinners.” Because the use of anticoagulation drugs, including Lovenox and Coumadin (Warfarin), require close monitoring, Floyd Memorial has started an Anticoagulation Management Services Outpatient Clinic. The goal of the Clinic is to monitor adult patients receiving anticoagulation therapy in partnership with the patient’s physician, providing a resource for physicians to improve the overall quality and continuity of care for their patients on anticoagulation therapy.

The Clinic is supervised by a physician medical director and staffed by clinical pharmacists who are highly-trained in anticoagulation management. The clinical pharmacists closely monitor patients, assess adverse reactions and counsel on regimen adherence. Patient education plays a key role as well as close interaction and follow-up with the patient’s physician. National research shows that receiving coordinated care for anticoagulation therapy can decrease the risk of negative side effects and improve patient results.

actionPatients interested in enrolling in the clinic should talk to the physician managing their anticoagulation therapy. For a free brochure, call 812-948-7674.